Beyond Broadcast

Leslie Wilcox, President and CEO of PBS HawaiiOne good thing about bad traffic: It allows motorists to check out our NEW HOME construction site along Nimitz Highway at Sand Island Access Road. And what they see is progress! PBS Hawaii has a lot going on “outside the box” of the TV, computer and cell phone screens. Here’s a quick update on some of our activities in the community:

 

Reaching New Heights
Last April, motorists’ windshields framed the sight of a large construction crane, hoisting steel columns into place. This structural steel creates and supports a second floor on top of an existing building that we’ve gutted and are recycling, as part of PBS Hawaii’s new facility, The Clarence T.C. Ching Campus.

 

A large construction crane hoists steel support beams into place at the site of PBS Hawaii’s NEW HOME. General contractor is Allied Builders System.

When heavy construction equipment on the site moves soil, one can see that there’s only a thin layer of dirt – from a few inches to a few feet deep – and it’s sitting on dense coral! This area must have been underwater a long time ago.

 

Right: A large construction crane hoists steel support beams into place at the site of PBS Hawaii’s NEW HOME. General contractor is Allied Builders System.

 

Today the site sits alongside one of the most heavily traveled land corridors in Honolulu. It’s easily accessible to visitors and staff; it’s on the the bus line near the airport and will offer great space to convene and connect people; and it’s a perfect spot for accessing satellites which we use to bring in some of our video programming.

 

Full House for Film Screening
Before INDEPENDENT LENS: Kumu Hina made its national and local broadcast premiere last May 4, PBS Hawaii joined filmmakers Dean Hamer and Joe Wilson, and community partners, in offering a screening of the film at the Hawaii State Capitol Auditorium. It drew a capacity crowd. Set mostly in Honolulu, Kumu Hina is the story of a teacher and mahu (transgender), her acceptance of herself, and her life with a younger man who was stunned to fall in love with a “kane-wahine.” Attendees spoke of the rejection and hurt they’d experienced and said the film made them feel less isolated. The take-away was Kumu Hina’s message of respect for others.

Kumu Hinaleimoana Wong-Kalu offers an opening oli at the local premiere of INDEPENDENT LENS: Kumu Hina April 21st, at the Hawaii State Capitol Auditorium. Kumu Hinaleimoana Wong-Kalu offers an opening oli at the local premiere of INDEPENDENT LENS: Kumu Hina April 21st, at the Hawaii State Capitol Auditorium.

 

PBS Hawaii Board Vice Chair Marissa Sandblom helps assemble Clifford the Big Red Dog headbands for keiki at Kauai’s Parent-Child Fair.

 

Community Events
When’s the last time you made and wore big red ears a la the PBS character Clifford the Big Red Dog? For those who participated in Kauai’s Parent-Child Fair, the answer is: just the other day! PBS Hawaii Board Vice Chair Marissa Sandblom of West Kauai took the lead in sharing with families. PBS Hawaii is honored to have residents from across the state serving on our unpaid governing Board of Directors and our Community Advisory Council. The council gives feedback on our television programming and makes recommendations.

 

We love our three screens – the TV, the computer and the cellphone. And the key to providing compelling content is to get out of the box and connect in person to understand what Hawaii citizens want and need in quality programming.

 

Aloha a hui hou,

 

Leslie signature